Movie Review: James Bondage and Skyfall

JAMES’ BONDAGE IS THE BONDAGE OF ALL OF US

I remember when I was around 12 years old, taking cold showers every day.  Brrr, so freezing my shanackers almost fell off!  All due to the influence of Ian Fleming’s James Bond character.  Yes, let’s blame him.  I wanted to be cool, tough, stealthy, admired.  A real man.

I wanted to mimic the famous British spy.  He was it.  The real deal.  Little did I know . . .

In fact, James is a lonely guy.  He can’t have a normal family.  Can’t get married and have a steady, life-long relationship.  No kids.  He’s an eternal celibate.

Sure he gets the girls.  But soon after, he must leave.   He is always being threatened.  He is always on the move.  He never seems to just want to chill out and relax.

Pity a man like that.  No family.  No community.  No love.

Just adrenaline rushes.  Fast cars.  Fast women.  Fast enemies.  Fast everything.

Sound familiar?  It almost seems that our friend and hero James is a symbol for Western society and all our Western Wannabes around the world.  Always rushing.  Always striving.  Never satisfied.  Never trusting.  Always waiting for an enemy to pop out from behind the bushes.  Always uneasy, on edge.

And basically dysfunctional.  A man who can’t love and be loved is not normal.  Nor is a society like this.

Check out any of the last three books written by social critic and professor Morris Berman. You can see James Bond on every page.  Western civilisation is fading.  But instead of fading and falling into the ocean, our demise is more like a Double O Seven run on an ancient roof, chasing the bad guy.  We run and run and run, then finally we trip and tumble down, down, down  . . .

THE SKY IS FALLING

Yes, I love my action flicks.  I am the typical Turtle Islander (North American) dude.  And Skyfall, the latest in the James Bond series, did not disappoint.  I was on the edge of my seat the entire time.  Most of the time cheering for Daniel Craig, who embodies all that is rough and ready, ballsy and brave, about James Bond.

Yet at other times I was mourning.  As I said earlier, here is one sad specimen of a human. He is all that we glorify, and yet all that we dread.  He has friendships, but they only last one movie long.  Such a pity.  Sometimes, for his own sake, I wonder if James was better off presumed dead.  Sure, he began to drink and appear depressed.  But he could overcome this, start getting healthy again, begin enjoying life.  He could get his adrenaline fix elsewhere.  M could find other superspies to find the bad guys.  Let Bond be human, leave him alone.  But, at last, he is drawn back into the game, when he sees on TV that MI6 HQ has been attacked.  Pity again.

On a higher level, we have to ask ourselves why the world would cheer on a man who represents the greatest and most extensive that has ever cursed the planet, the Anglo-American Empire.  MIA, CIA, it’s all the same doggy  doo-doo, different piles.  James Bond is one of the information-gatherings and enforcers for the Empire.  Whom Bond and the Empire see as enemies are not necessarily the bad guys.  Maybe they are actually the good guys.  Or maybe . . . they have been trained, Hollywood-style, to look like bad guys, but are actually being paid by the same financial sponsors.  Ever wondered? . . .

Honestly, I think the Bad Dude of Skyfall was probably the best character in the entire movie.  Javier Bardem as former MI6er turned cyberterrorist Raoul Silva was a pleasure to watch.  He did BAD so GOOD . . . I mean, I nearly started liking Silva, until I saw how much evil he was ready to inflict on his fellow humans.  Here was the missing humour that we wished Daniel Craig could exhibit.  This is reason I miss Pierce Brosnan did the funny thing so well too.  Must be that Irish and Scots can play a better Brit than the Brits themselves.

Naomie Harris, as Bond’s sidekick, was the cat’s meow and the bee’s knees.  She could carry an entire spy flick by herself.  Her acting skills were tremendous.  In addition, she is a spry one; she was ahead of Bond most of the way.  And she’s also a lot better looking.  Her only downfall is that she’s a bad shot with moving targets.  Nawda problem, James forgave her soon after.  As should we all.

Skyfall . . . what else can I say?  Great character development, seat-edge action sequences, astounding hi-tech, it has it all.  I actually saw it twice last weekend, once with a buddy and a second time with a family friend and my 79 year old Dad.  Of course, he didn’t get it.  He never understands any movie I take him to these days.

Someone else is getting old: looks like Daniel Craig may not have too many Bond films left.  One of Skyfall’s themes was Bond’s age.  “It’s a young man’s game,” hinted his new boss.  Bond is getting old too ancient and decrepit for the running around spying scene.  Personally, the older guys are more interesting.  More experienced.  A little slower, but whatever.  They’re more calculating.  Youngins often arrive at the finish line slower precisely because they’re too fast . . . and impulsive.

Sorry I don’t have much else to say about Skyfall.  See it for yourself.  It’s like a mirror reflecting your Western Self back at you, especially if you’re a dude.

Cheers,

Dimitri

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About sleepless in turtle island

Hi, I´m Dimitri. I have lived in Turtle Island for awhile now, so my cultural understanding is slowly improving. Also, I can see things in this place that boggle my mind. Thus this blog...
This entry was posted in Movies, Politics - International, Politics - US, Social Justice, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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